Chris Fisher Invited Speaker at the Tower of London for the CyArk 500

Posted on 30. Sep, 2013 by Christopher Fisher in Cuidad Blanca, Honduras, LiDAR, Mosquitia, News, Technology, archaeology

Chris Fisher Invited Speaker at the Tower of London for the CyArk 500

The CyArk 500 Conference

Chris Fisher, along with Steve Elkins – UTL, Juan Carlos Fernandez – NCALM,  and Virgilio Paredes Trapero – Director of IHAH, will be speaking on October 20-22 at the Tower of London on results and implications from the Mosquitia Honduras project.  At this event CyArk will formally launch the CyArk 500 Challenge to digitally preserve 500 cultural heritage sites within the next five years.  As part of their long-standing mission CyArk hopes to save these cultural heritage sites digitally before more are ravaged by war, terrorism, arson, urban sprawl, climate change, earthquakes, floods, and other threats. There isn’t enough money or enough time to physically save every site, but CyArk wants to use 3D technology to digitally save these sites to make them available for generations to come.

Should be a great venue to showcase our LiDAR efforts

Chris

The Main Platform at Angamuco animated

Posted on 24. Apr, 2013 by Christopher Fisher in LORE-LPB, LiDAR, Pátzcuaro Archaeology, Technology, archaeology

The Main Platform at Angamuco animated

This animation shows the area of the Main Platform at Angamuco with and without the overlying vegetation.  A static image of this view has been featured in many recent publications.

Archaeology as Technology

Posted on 26. Apr, 2010 by Christopher Fisher in LORE-LPB, Technology

Archaeology as Technology

University of Washington graduate student Anna Cohen mapping a house mound with Trimble technology, Lake Pátzcuaro Basin, Michoacán, Mexico, summer 2009

It’s probably fitting that this is the first blog post on the new Legacies of Resilience (LORE-LPB) website as this project is so tech dependent.  LORE-LPB has taken advantage of recent advances in mobile computing to document architectural features faster, and with a higher degree of accuracy, then traditional full coverage archaeological survey.  This allows us to occupy a ‘middle ground between traditional extensive-style survey and more intensive mapping done with a total station.

In a recent poster at the Society for American Archaeology annual meeting in Saint Louis we outlined the methodology that we use, which is based on Trimble hardware and software (TrimbleRecon rugged handheld computers as well as the GeoXH and GeoXT GPS receivers, and Terrasync and Pathfinder office software).  We also got some props from the blogosphere for our use of these new technologies. Curt Hopkins originally hooked me up with much of this gear and I owe him a big thank you!!

The big issue for us now is how do we organize all of this new information?  How can we harness all of these data to address traditional archaeological questions?  And . . . is this going to lead us to new questions?

Chris